Such A Fun Age

Such A Fun Age

A Novel

Large Print - 2019
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Alix Chamberlain is a woman who gets what she wants and has made a living, with her confidence-driven brand, showing other women how to do the same. So she is shocked when her babysitter, Emira Tucker, is confronted while watching the Chamberlains' toddler one night, walking the aisles of their local high-end supermarket. The store's security guard, seeing a young black woman out late with a white child, accuses Emira of kidnapping two-year-old Briar. A small crowd gathers, a bystander films everything, and Emira is furious and humilated. Alix resolves to make things right. But Emira herself is aimless, broke, and wary of Alix's desire to help. At twenty-five, she is about to lose her health insurance and has no idea what to do with her life. When the video of Emira unearths someone from Alix's past, both women find themselves on a crash course that will upend everything they think they know about themselves, and each other.
Publisher: [New York] : Random House Large Print, [2019]
Edition: Large print edition.
Copyright Date: ©2019
ISBN: 9780593152379
0593152379
Branch Call Number: LPF REID, KILEY
Characteristics: 389 pages (large print) ; 24 cm
large print.,rdafs

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ElizabethGilbert
Apr 09, 2021

This is one of the best books I've ever read, and I'm in my mid-40s and read a lot. I loved how the characters were all so nuanced. None of them felt like a "that type of person." They each had negative and positive qualities, made good and bad choices, etc. The dialogue was fantastic. The relationships were exquisitely drawn (the one between Emira, the protagonist, and her employer made my skin crawl). I was just astounded by the writing. Yes, it's got themes of subtle and not-so-subtle clashing of races and the concept of entitlement, the crises that new mothers sometimes face, etc., but it is a human being's experience we're reading about, not a lesson in any of those things. Read it.

JCLHebahA Apr 05, 2021

This would be an engaging book club book - feels fast and frothy while still dealing with pertinent social issues. I wasn't a huge fan of the ending, but honestly, books with contentious endings do generate great discussion.

loonylovesgood Mar 31, 2021

The main protagonist, Alix, is a very difficult character to like, yet somehow you almost end up feeling sorry for her as well. This was a good story, if a bit uneven in parts. It also ended rather abruptly too.

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Petrarousu
Mar 29, 2021

A well-balanced book giving you insights in the difficulty of races, told in a heart-warming story. Your understanding of all sides increases and eliminates judgement. The only thing that bothered me is the title; it has absolutely nothing to do with the story.

FPL_Lori Feb 18, 2021

Such a Fun Age had me hooked in the first scene. Reid does an excellent job with characters and dialogue, while also creating a page-turning story. While it is entertaining and highly readable, it is also a telling illustration of race, class, social media, and privacy in present-day America. It paints a picture without casting judgment in a preachy way. Highly recommended for books clubs as there is so much fodder for discussion- but also a good choice to take to the beach or on a plane.

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michellecharris
Jan 18, 2021

Just going to say it.....hated it! The storyline was just dumb. Mentions of Hillary Clinton irked me as well as all of the racial references. I felt as though the author was more interested in telling her readers her liberal views or how we should view women of color. I read to be entertained, not “lectured”.

LoganLib_JennyI Jan 10, 2021

Some say this book is too light to cover the serious themes of racism and class, however as a middle class, caucasian person I felt uncomfortable after reading it. So I believe Reid's debut novel speaks with power. Power, not through a story based on huge, violent events affecting tens of thousands, but power through giving weight and insight to an everyday young woman, Emira.
Reid places us in firmly in Emira's shoes - during the inciting incident of the book, in her job, with her friends and relationships and with her inner dialogue about where she "should" be in her mid twenties.
There is fun in the scenes when Emira is with her girlfriends, tenderness in the adventures of Emira and Briar, awkwardness and confusion in the relationship between Alix and Emira and psychological damage, or soon to be, between Alix, Kelley and Emira.

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a2mayer
Jan 08, 2021

I don’t know how I feel about this book. I enjoyed the light reading and the funny interactions between characters all well addressing some big themes like racism and privilege of wealth. But the ending did not move me and left me wondering if the characters learned anything from the events that took place.
*It should also be noted that there is a lot of swearing in this book.

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ellenorndorf
Dec 19, 2020

I got this book our of my neighbor's little free library. I liked it though was sad that Emira and Kelley didn't end up together. I get why though. Both Alix and Kelley were deep flawed people that couldn't see their own shortcomings.

IndyPL_CarriG Dec 18, 2020

Ooof. A powerful read that sneaks up on you. Emira is a young woman from a family of talented makers, who has yet to come up with a life plan. She works two part-time jobs, one as a transcriber and one as a baby-sitter for an inquisitive and brash little girl who she adores. Her friends are all more successful and driven than she is, and she knows her jobs aren't ideal, but she can't bring herself to really contemplate leaving her fun and fiery charge. One evening, the mother frantically calls her - there was an incident that she needs to call the police for, will Emira please come take little Briar to the upscale grocery store down the street while they are there so she is not traumatized? Dressed for an evening out with her girlfriends Emira shows up, takes little Briar to the store, and is accused of kidnapping her by "concerned" customers. The security guard won't let her leave until Emira calls the father and he shows up, an older white man, to confirm Emira's identity. The incident is filmed by another white man who suggests she sue, post it online, become famous, yada yada yada. Emira is not interested in any of that nonsense - she just wants to live her life and not be a poster child for discrimination.

The rest of the book is a critique of woke culture and micro-aggressions. Emira's life is constantly being picked apart by the white progressives in her life who want her to do more, be better, and, above all, appreciate their involvement. Sometimes this book is so uncomfortable to read I was literally squirming - like watching the infamous "Scott's Tots" episode of The Office bad. Emira is a sympathetic character and very relatable - her friends are lovely, fun, and supportive. The mother in the book constantly made me want to scream and squish my eyes shut and wish her away. The man she ends up dating, on the other hand, made me roll my eyes in exasperation over and over and over again, until I was worried they would get stuck that way. This is a powerful novel about the little earthquakes of racism and behavior that are not talked about as much as the more violent and obvious behaviors like violence, police brutality, and discriminatory hiring practices. It is uncomfortable, important, and definitely causes a reaction.

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LoganLib_JennyI Jan 10, 2021

"I'm probably gonna start looking for a one-bedroom or a studio."
"Oh, for real?" Emira was shocked, and then she was jealous, and then she wondered, Is that what we're supposed to be doing right now? Cause if it is, I ain't there."

ArapahoeMaryA Apr 25, 2020

One day, when Emira would say good-bye to Briar, she'd also leave the joy of having somewhere to be, the satisfaction of understanding the rules, the comfort of knowing what's coming next, and the privilege of finding a home within yourself.

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